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Date Archives: January 2017

Quick Realtor Tips - Neighborhood Marketing Reports Home

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January
30

Three ways to ease your fears about making a move:

 

Moving can be scary, but it doesnt have ot be.  THe right #realtor can make all the different - and at Eagle Realty we strive to make all our clients comfortable the purchase/selling process as easy as possible.  Here are some tips below...

With low inventory in many markets throughout the country, many homeowners are afraid to sell their homes because they're concerned that they may not be able to find a new one. This can be a real problem, but if you are seeking to sell—whether to upgrade or find a new neighborhood—there are a few ways to combat the low inventory.

Look to buy first In most markets it is a real mistake to put your home up for sale before you start looking for your new property. Identify the geographic area where you are interested in buying. Even if you don't see anything on Zillow, it doesn't mean you can't or won't find the right home.

Think outside the box Be proactive! Keep in mind that there are probably many people like you who want to make a move but are afraid as well. Have your real estate agent send a letter to the neighborhoods in the geographic areas where you want to live. The letter should be heartfelt and personal while announcing that you are ready to buy a home in that neighborhood. You could find a home to buy that may not even be currently listed or for sale.

Protect yourself legally Each state varies in how the purchase process is conducted. Talk to your real estate professional about adding a clause in the purchase contract for the home you are selling that will enable you to not sell the home if you cannot find a suitable home to buy.

 

January
16

When it really comes down to it, you either improve the home you have or you move to one that has what you want.

Unless you built a custom home, you probably have a long list of things you'd like to improve in your current home. Browsing online listings might get you in the mood to upgrade to a new home, or you might be thinking about renovating your current home after binging on HGTV. The answer to renovation vs. relocation depends greatly on what you're trying to fix.

Thinking about a new kitchen? If you're dreaming of a chef's kitchen with new appliances and beautiful cabinets, renovating your own kitchen gives you incredible ROI and is less costly than moving. You'll increase the value of your own home if you ever decide to sell, and there's a great sense of accomplishment that comes with completing a custom renovation.

Need more space? If you're running low on bedrooms, there may not be a lot of options. Converting an existing room to a bedroom doesn't create any new space. If you're in a condo, an addition is probably impossible. And additions can be expensive even if it's a possibility. Moving is usually the best option.

If the neighborhood isn't ideal You may have seen some potential for your neighborhood when you first moved there, but perhaps it still isn't welcoming the shops and restaurants you expected. If that's the case, consider moving. There's no sense in waiting years for the neighborhood to improve, especially if you can move to a house in the same price range in a more preferred part of the city.

 

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January
12

The Next Big Smart Home Trend is Voice Control

As a consumer - you probably are in awe of how fast technology is affecting your home and everyday life - did you know that voice-control is the future for your home?  check this article out from Inman news!

"So, what exactly do consumers want to control with these tools? Entertainment.

Fifty-seven percent of Americans who currently use voice control use it in conjunction with smart entertainment products, such as smart TVs. Smart lighting (33 percent), smart security (33 percent), shopping (33 percent) and smart temperature (30 percent) rounded out the top five uses.

For those who want voice control products, but don't have it, 43 percent want to use it to control smart entertainment as well. Smart lighting (42 percent), smart temperature (41 percent), smart security (36 percent) and smart appliances (19 percent) were the top needs for that demographic.

Survey respondents said they believed voice control would enhance their day-to-day home experience through hands-free control, user-friendliness compared to other options and the flexibility in location — all of which make this technology the perfect tool for parents.

A whopping 81 percent of American parents with smart home products with voice control, and an equally impressive 64 percent already use voice control tools.

"We're not surprised that so many Americans want to be able to use their voice to control smart home products because it makes for a much more intuitive user experience," said Coldwell Banker chief marketing officer Sean Blankenship in a statement. "As the smart home leader in real estate, Coldwell Banker is at the forefront of smart home trends and we're hearing directly from our agents that their clients are demanding voice control to make their smart home experience more seamless."

The survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Coldwell Banker Real Estate and Vivint Smart Home. The survey dates were open from November 14 through 16 and 18 through 22 in 2016. Among the 4,108 U.S. adults who participated, 923 had a smart home product."

January
5

There's no more important time to work on your credit score than when you're about to apply for a mortgage. Improving your credit can save you a ton of money—we're talking about thousands of dollars over the life of the loan. Here are the actions you can take that will have a notable impact on your score.

Pay down your credit card balances Credit utilization is one of the biggest factors in determining your credit score. Your credit utilization should at least be less than 30 percent of your limit, and it's even better if you can get it below 15 percent. This rule applies to both individual cards and your overall credit limit.

It may even be worthwhile to use some of the cash funds you were planning to use for a down payment to pay off credit card balances.

Do no harm While you certainly want to improve your score if possible, at the very least you'll want to keep it steady. Avoid opening new lines of credit if you're applying for a mortgage in the very near future. This will cause a hard inquiry to show up on your credit report.

Take care of negative items It's good practice to check your credit report for negative items a few times a year—you can get one free report from each of the three major bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion) per year.

If you find any negative items (collections, late payments, etc.), write a letter to the original creditor. Explain the circumstances that led to the negative item, and request that it be removed from your report. It can be surprisingly effective, and removing a negative item will improve your credit score in a hurry. You can find some good templates for a request letter online.